Archives: Anti-corruption

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New OFAC CAPTA List Targets Foreign Banks

The Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) recently announced the creation of a new list of sanctioned parties specific to foreign financial institutions (“FFIs”). The Correspondent Account of Payable-Through Account Sanctions (the “CAPTA List”) identifies FFIs that are prohibited or severely restricted from opening or maintaining a U.S. correspondent account.… Continue Reading

Linguistic Clues Narrow Identity of Country A in Mueller Probe

Fascination continues about the identity of Country A in Special Counsel Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference.  An unidentified corporation is a witness in the investigation and is owned by Country A. Recent developments provide clues in the unredacted portions of unsealed court rulings and party filings.  Based on linguistic analysis of court rulings and pleadings, Kristina … Continue Reading

Will Russia Provide Missing Links to Murder, Kickbacks, Bribery?

The case against Leonid Teyf, a Russian citizen, in a federal court in North Carolina has enough juicy facts for an international crime novel. The U.S. prosecutors need evidence to convict Teyf and his accomplices of the central charges, stemming from an alleged kickback scheme in Russia. Will Russia provide missing links?… Continue Reading

Russia Continues Anticorruption Efforts in 2019

Russia continues its anticorruption efforts in 2019. These efforts build upon numerous convictions last year.  In January 2019, despite the two-week public winter break, two significant cases developed. Beyond seeking additional convictions, the Russian government will implement public anticorruption outreach this year.… Continue Reading

Brazil Strengthens Battle Against Corruption

In August 2018, in an effort to battle corruption, Brazil enacted Decree-Law No. 9,468/18, which provides broader power to the Public Transparency and Anti-Corruption Council.  The Council’s purpose is to discuss ideas and suggestions to improve policies and strategies aimed at combating corruption and impunity within the Federal Public Administration. For a closer look at … Continue Reading

Hoskins May Limit Extraterritorial Enforcement of U.S. Sanctions

The Second Circuit’s recent decision in United States v. Hoskins may impact enforcement of U.S. economic sanctions programs. The Hoskins decision precludes the government from charging a foreign national acting abroad with violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) through theories of conspiracy and accomplice liability. This holding is equally applicable to U.S. sanctions law.… Continue Reading

Britain Lifts Veil of Financial Secrecy for Overseas Territories

The UK Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act signifies major changes to the UK’s anti-money laundering and sanctions regimes. Britain’s overseas territories, often criticized as tax havens, are now required to establish public registries of beneficial corporate ownership by December 31, 2020. The Act also includes a Magnitsky Amendment, modeled on U.S. law, enabling sanctions against … Continue Reading

Circuit Rejects Expansive Use of Conspiracy for FCPA

The Second Circuit issued its judgment on the case we have been monitoring, U.S. v. Hoskins. The court held that the “government may not expand the extraterritorial reach of the FCPA by recourse to the conspiracy and complicity statutes.”… Continue Reading

The Yacht Equanimity: a Symbol of Corruption?

This month, former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, who served from 2009 to 2018 as Malaysia’s sixth Prime Minister, pleaded not guilty to three new money-laundering charges related to the alleged multibillion-dollar looting of 1Malaysia Development Berhad (“1MDB”), a Kuala Lumpur-based strategic development company that is wholly owned by the Malaysian Ministry of Finance. The … Continue Reading

DPA Regime a Landmark Change to Singaporean Law

A recent landmark change to Singapore’s criminal justice system providing for Deferred Prosecution Agreements (“DPAs”), or voluntary alternatives to adjudication, should increase corporate accountability for acts of bribery, corruption, and money laundering.… Continue Reading

Compliance Prevents Corporate Casualties in Trade Wars

Tariffs are not the only weapon of retaliation countries may wield in a trade war.  Governments can pressure trade adversaries at the bargaining table by opening other fronts, such as limiting foreign investment, halting drug enforcement cooperation, or, of particular concern to the corporate world, scrutinizing companies doing business within their jurisdictions.  What does this mean?… Continue Reading

Serious Fraud Office: Apparent Renewed Faith

In the first part of this two-part post, we looked at some of the infamous cases that may explain repeated attempts by Theresa May, first as Home Secretary and later as Prime Minister, to dismantle the SFO, see here. Our attentions now turn to the important role the SFO continues to play in combatting corruption, … Continue Reading

Serious Fraud Office: Boost to Coffers Is Vote of Confidence

The UK’s Serious Fraud Office (“SFO”) recently received an unexpected, yet significant, increase in baseline funding for the 2018-2019 fiscal year. The funding boost comes in spite of Prime Minister Theresa May’s previous efforts, following several high-profile prosecutorial setbacks for the SFO, to fold it into the UK’s National Crime Agency (“NCA”). Relatedly, a new … Continue Reading

Mexico’s Federal Criminal Code and the New General Law of Administrative Responsibility

In part two of our series on Mexico’s anticorruption legislation,  we take a closer look at both the 2016 amendments to the Federal Criminal Code and the compliance provisions of the General Law of Administrative Responsibility as these laws apply to legal entities. Although these amendments are generally discussed separately, we believe that these laws, … Continue Reading

Mexico’s Anticorruption Legislation and its Impact

As a tsunami of corruption scandals devastates Latin America’s political landscape, it can be easy to dismiss the slow and uncertain steps many countries are taking in the fight against corruption as political jujitsu, enough to appease but not to change. We do not, and we remain optimistic as Mexico, Peru, Colombia, Argentina and – … Continue Reading

The SEC’s New Year’s Resolutions: Retail Investors and Cybersecurity

2018 arrived in the wake of big changes at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“the SEC”).  Jay Clayton was sworn in as Chairman of the Commission in May, naming Steve Peikin and Stephanie Avakian as Co-Directors of the Enforcement Division (the “Division”) in June.  As many do for the start of a new year, … Continue Reading

Canada Outlaws Facilitation Payments

Facilitation payments are no longer exempt under Canada’s Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act.  On October 30, 2017, Global Affairs Canada, which manages diplomatic relations and promotes international trade, announced the end of the exemption.  This change was initiated in 2013 but delayed to give companies time to adjust their policies and procedures.  Effective October … Continue Reading

Criminal Finances Act 2017 – New Corporate Offences of Failing to Prevent Facilitation of Tax Evasion

The United Kingdom’s National Risk Assessment of money laundering and terrorist financing in October 2015 identified three priority risks faced by the UK and concluded that a more robust enforcement response is required. These changes were to be underpinned by a partnership between the government and the private sector to effect a significant change in … Continue Reading

Major Changes on Whistleblowing in France

From January 1, 2018, there will be an obligation on almost all employers to implement reporting/whistleblowing schemes. France has historically been very reluctant to support workplace whistleblowing, especially anonymously. Whistleblowing schemes were effectively only authorized in 2005 to permit US companies to comply with their SOX obligations. Those regulations were very restrictive, limited to employees … Continue Reading

Tabcorp fined $45 million

Gaming company Tabcorp has been fined $45 million for breaching anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism financing laws. The Federal Court found that Tabcorp broke the law on 108 occasions over five years. The fine imposed by the Federal Court is the highest civil penalty in Australian corporate history. The multi million dollar fine was handed down … Continue Reading

Rolls-Royce Set to Avoid Prosecution After Bribery Settlement

Rolls-Royce has agreed to pay £671 million in penalties in response to several long-running bribery and corruption investigations.  Regulators in the UK, the United States and Brazil investigated claims that Rolls-Royce had paid bribes to intermediaries to secure high-value export contracts in a number of overseas markets, including China, Brazil and Indonesia. In a press … Continue Reading

Law 1778, Colombia’s Latest Attempt at Bringing its Anti-bribery Laws into Compliance with the OECD Anti-bribery Convention

Since being elected in 2010, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos has been trying to have Colombia become a member of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). As part of this endeavor, in January 2011, Colombia formally applied to become a participant of the Working Group on Bribery in International Business Transactions (the “Working … Continue Reading
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